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> Instant tube sealant opinions?
BigLoada
post Mar 21 2012, 04:39 PM
Post #1


Group: Members
Joined: 7-April 09
From: Bedlington, Northumberland



Hello folks, please bear with me and my novice questions.. only just got into proper off road biking after a couple of years commuting to work.. anyway! Just got me a new bike and now I am venturing off road in the Cheviot Hills I thought I best get me some puncture repair gear. Now.. things have changed in the last 25 years.. I found this "instant sealant" thing that you just pump into a bust tube.. this stuff: http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/zefal-sealant-spray

But what do you experienced guys think? Am I better off taking a good old puncture repair kit? Or do these modern sealant things really work?

Any advice for an old guy getting back into biking is most appreciated wink.gif

Cheers!
Dean
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bazza
post Mar 21 2012, 06:56 PM
Post #2


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Joined: 6-July 06
From: Watford, WD24, UK



This is a tough one to reply to!!

To answer the question: Would I buy this product, and use it? No.

Here's why:-

I usually run tubeless. This means I have no 'inner' to puncture, and I already have sealant running around inside my tyre (Stan's - use no other!).
That said, I always carry an 'inner' - sometimes you slice tyres, or punctures refuse to seal. When riding XC, and miles from home, you should always be prepared.
And, I always carry pre-glued patches as well. Again, in case I have to fit the tube, and *then* I get a puncture.
And if I'm already running tubes and get a puncture, I rarely repair the tube trail-side. Usually just fit another 'inner' and carry on riding.

I'm very used to repairing tubes. I can get them off, repaired, re-fitted in a few mins.
And, that is why I wouldn't use this product.

In addition, I'd be dubious about being able to repair and re-use the tube once it's filled with this stuff.

Again, the above is just me. I'm setup to run tubeless, and appreciate that not everyone is, nor are they adept at changing tubes. So, this may be useful to some.


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NB: It's unlikely I'll see your reply. So, please PM me if you need a response.
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Jambalaya
post Mar 21 2012, 07:34 PM
Post #3


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Joined: 21-May 08
From: Guildford



The vast majority of us carry a spare inner tube, plus tyre levers and a pump. A repair kit is carried by some as an additional safety measure, of course the further you are from help/transport the more self reliant you must be.

If you get a puncture you pop the new tube in then carry the other home for repair at a later stage using a decent repair kit.
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BigLoada
post Mar 21 2012, 08:07 PM
Post #4


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Joined: 7-April 09
From: Bedlington, Northumberland



Thanks guys. I guess carrying a couple of spare tubes would actually be lighter than this can of sealant, now that I have thought about it.Just wondered if it was the thing to have or of it was just a fancy gimmick. Like I say, I am a bit out of touch with stuff!
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Mad Pierre
post Mar 22 2012, 09:22 AM
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Joined: 2-November 05
From: Melton Mowbray



If you are running tubes then do carry a spare but also use Slime tubes. Buy the pre-filled tubes rather than adding it yourself - it's less hassle. They work brilliantly against thorn punctures.


--------------------
Jaws was never my scene and I don't like Star Wars

My corner of the interweb: www.mountainbikerides.co.uk
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SuperJJ
post Mar 22 2012, 12:21 PM
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From: Southport, NW UK



I too use the slime tubes and can second mad pierre's comments (although I haven't been using them for long).

I got mine off ebay cheap.
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BigLoada
post Mar 22 2012, 05:43 PM
Post #7


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Joined: 7-April 09
From: Bedlington, Northumberland



Great thanks for the "slime tube" info. I have heard of slime but did not know tubes could be got with it already inside them. Thanks guys smile.gif
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Gareth
post Mar 22 2012, 06:32 PM
Post #8


Group: Root Admin
Joined: 28-July 04



Slime tubes are the easiest solution to thorn punctures. Going tubeless, Ghetto or Stan's is superior in weight, rolling resistance and puncture resistance but it is not a simple procedure for most riders.

If you do go tubeless be aware that your tyre will have probably more than one thorn in it waiting to puncture your emergency tube so these must be removed before fitting it! You wouldn't notice a dozen thorns in your tyre run tubeless with sufficient latex sealant!


--------------------
Get proper instruction www.mountainbikeinstruction.co.uk
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torihada
post Mar 23 2012, 03:23 PM
Post #9


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Joined: 28-May 07
From: exiled in sarf east London



QUOTE(Gareth @ Mar 22 2012, 06:32 PM) *
Slime tubes are the easiest solution to thorn punctures. Going tubeless, Ghetto or Stan's is superior in weight, rolling resistance and puncture resistance but it is not a simple procedure for most riders.

If you do go tubeless be aware that your tyre will have probably more than one thorn in it waiting to puncture your emergency tube so these must be removed before fitting it! You wouldn't notice a dozen thorns in your tyre run tubeless with sufficient latex sealant!


Last night (after burping a Bonty TLR off the rim) I got one puncture that I managed to plug with tubeless repair kit (all the juice spurted out like a fountain). I then got a massive thorn puncture which wouldn't plug and when fitting the tube found a further 3 thorns stuck in the tyre casing. So, running TLR tyres on TLR rims I carry two tubes and a tubeless repair kit, a pump and 2 CO2 canisters.

BTW. After last night's hard riding I'm saying adios to Bonty tubeless tyres (I've burped them off all of my bikes - Bonty & Mavic UST rims- at one time or another and I've damaged the bead and or sidewall on 1 Big Earl, 1 XR4 and 2 Mud X). I'm going to try a High Roller LUST and a Kenda Neveegal UST to replace the two Mud X (one brand new with a knackered bead).


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There do appear to be some hills south of the Trent...
http://www.youtube.com/butahada
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Gareth
post Mar 23 2012, 06:58 PM
Post #10


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Joined: 28-July 04



QUOTE
Last night (after burping a Bonty TLR off the rim) I got one puncture that I managed to plug with tubeless repair kit (all the juice spurted out like a fountain). I then got a massive thorn puncture which wouldn't plug and when fitting the tube found a further 3 thorns stuck in the tyre casing. So, running TLR tyres on TLR rims I carry two tubes and a tubeless repair kit, a pump and 2 CO2 canisters.


Dude you are a puncture nightmare! wink.gif

Burps can be caused by poor fitting rim/tyre combinations or running too low a pressure. Ghetto setups are slightly less likely to burp than UST as the 'rim strip' can stay stuck to the tyre as it moves away from the rim, they're certainly not burp proof though, far from it!

As you have discovered, tubeless is essential in thorn land.

My favourite 'anti burp' combination is a Stan's rim (I use Flow) with any tubeless ready tyre (I use Bontrager Big Earl Wet 2.5 Kevlars). If you run low pressures though you might be better off with a downhill setup of thick tube and double wall tyres... rolleyes.gif

For those who don't know all about burping:
Happens when the tyre is pushed away from the rim for a split second allowing air to escape.
Results in a loss of pressure, sometimes enough to release the rim/bead seal when the tyre will deflate.
Is most common during extreme side loading of the tyre e.g. a dodgy landing from a jump or extreme cornering.
Will definitely happen at some point if you use very low pressures.
Will happen again real soon if you don't top up with air after a first 'burp'.
Is more common the heavier you are.
Is more common with tyres that were difficult to convert to tubeless.
Is a lot less common with Stan's rims.
Hasn't happened to me for years since going Ghetto/Stan's rims. stupidlyhappy.gif


--------------------
Get proper instruction www.mountainbikeinstruction.co.uk
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Suggsey
post Mar 23 2012, 11:15 PM
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From: Nuneaton



I am glad that I just ordered some Conti Rubber Queen Black Chilli UST tyres instead of Bontis as I have been destroying the beads on standard single ply Maxxis Minnion DHR tyres.
Only burped ghetto tyres twice both by me being clumsy and clipping the edge of a tree stump and a very large scottish rock!
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torihada
post Mar 24 2012, 01:02 PM
Post #12


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Joined: 28-May 07
From: exiled in sarf east London



QUOTE(Suggsey @ Mar 23 2012, 11:15 PM) *
I am glad that I just ordered some Conti Rubber Queen Black Chilli UST tyres instead of Bontis as I have been destroying the beads on standard single ply Maxxis Minnion DHR tyres.
Only burped ghetto tyres twice both by me being clumsy and clipping the edge of a tree stump and a very large scottish rock!


I've got a set of Conti Rubber Queen USTs that I run on my Orange 5 (Mavic UST rims). They're a great, large volume tyre with really tough sidewalls. Lot of my crew have swapped to the Rubber Queens. Great grip though a bit draggy, so now only running it as a front tyre with a Bonty XR3 on the back.

I haven't burped a UST tyre off a UST rim so far pray.gif .


--------------------
There do appear to be some hills south of the Trent...
http://www.youtube.com/butahada
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Tuffty
post Mar 24 2012, 02:17 PM
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Joined: 12-August 07
From: Kettering



My new wheels will have stans rims, and I am going tubelss for the first time, on the subject of burping tyres off rims (just love that phrase smile.gif ) How low a pressure do you call low Gareth?


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If man is supposed to be vegetarian, then why are animals so damn tasty??
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BigLoada
post Mar 26 2012, 07:04 PM
Post #14


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Joined: 7-April 09
From: Bedlington, Northumberland



Hey guys thanks for all the info. And cheers for the "burping" explanation gareth! Well I just bought a couple of spare tubes, a repair kit (the old fashioned type, not the glueless ones) and a Co2 inflator. Just need a mini pump to take with me and I reckon I'll be set. Great to be back on a bike again, I have really missed it smile.gif
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Gareth
post Mar 26 2012, 08:55 PM
Post #15


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Joined: 28-July 04



QUOTE
My new wheels will have stans rims, and I am going tubelss for the first time, on the subject of burping tyres off rims (just love that phrase ) How low a pressure do you call low Gareth?


There is no simple answer to this, anything under 30psi perhaps but it really does depend on tyre size, your weight and riding style. sneaky.gif


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Get proper instruction www.mountainbikeinstruction.co.uk
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Gezzza
post Apr 24 2012, 07:05 PM
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Joined: 26-August 08
From: Hampshire



When i ran stans 355 rims i used to run my raceking 2.2 supersonics at 20/22psi and never burped, now that i run DTswiss XRC330 i have to run a min of 28psi or they burp.

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