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> Tubeless repair, Where did I go wrong?
Chris M
post Oct 16 2009, 09:40 AM
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From: Kent



Been chuffed to bits with the ghetto conversion, more grip, no punctures, no burping, everythings great biggrin.gif

However, I did have a very small but persistant hole in the sidewall that kept leaking.

Last night, preparing for a nightride, i thought I'd fix it for good with my new Weldtite repair kit.

So, I ram the cleaning hole through the pinprick to clean it and roughen the edges and am left with a faily large hole, obviously.

Then, I thread a third of one of those Weird Brown lugworm type things onto the needle, coat it in glue, poke it in and slowly remove it.

Reinflate the tyre and air is rushing out at quite a lick.

So, I repeat the operation with a longer length of "lugworm" but still no joy. In the end I had to put a tube in. Where did I go wrong?

I did thread the "lugworm" through the needle which flattened one half of it, should I have just poked the needle onto it halfway along its length or does it not matter? have I just got a faulty kit?

Any help appreciated


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Mad Pierre
post Oct 16 2009, 10:41 AM
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From: Melton Mowbray



Sounds like you made the hole too big with the pokey thing? You don't need to use it like a file.

Doesn't matter about the threading - never caused me an issue.

Having said that I run proper UST. Never tried the kit on a bodge job...


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Gareth
post Oct 16 2009, 11:04 AM
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Joined: 28-July 04



The 'plug' technique is not really suitable for sidewall holes. These should be patched from the inside as if you were patching a tube. If your tyre has a really thick sidewall it might be possible to plug them, especially if the hole was only small, UST tyres tend to have more rubber in the sidewall but this can often be seen as a disadvantage by those looking for a large, lightweight tyre (Many All Mountain riders).

When you do patch from the inside make sure to clean the area for patching, get rid of all the Latex goo and then use alcohol to prep the area for the patch (you can buy a special patch kit with bigger, thicker patches but normal inner tube kits will work). If you sand away enthusiasticaly at the inner wall of a non-UST tyre you may well find you expose the fibres of the tyre carcass and this will make it harder to get a patch to stick.

If you have a large cut in the sidewall of any tyre it will need sewing and booting and an inner tube to get you going. To be honest at this point I get home and then write it off. In the past I have ridden with a hand sewn tyre until the tread wore out months later! (I was poor in those days...). biggrin.gif


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Chris M
post Oct 16 2009, 12:37 PM
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Joined: 18-March 07
From: Kent



Fantastic, thank you.

I did try patching it on the inside with a conventional patch but as I was rushing to go, I only gave the tyre a cursory wipe over first so the patch just harmlessly fell off.
I'll give it a proper clean this evening then and seal it properly.

I think I'm going to switch to Stan's for the hardtail. I'm a little dissapointed the Bontrager sealant wouldn't plug the initial hole as it was only a thorn prick, nothing major.

Cheers

Chris smile.gif


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bobosola
post Oct 16 2009, 11:38 PM
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Joined: 22-June 06
From: Locks Heath, Hampshire



Similar issues with my tubeless setup. I've used the tubeless repair kit a couple of times successfully where I got a big nail-sized hole was in the main tread area, but I've been unlucky enough to have 2 side wall holes which wouldn't fix at all. I tried patching from the inside but in both cases the patch forced its way through the wall under pressure to form a risky-looking bulge. I've come to the conclusion that (1) tubeless repair kits are best suited for the treaded section of the tyre and (2) anything other than a really tiny pinhole sized hole in the sidewall means a new tyre :-( I'm currently temporarily back on tubes again until I can justify spending on yet another new tyre.


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Chris M
post Oct 17 2009, 06:47 AM
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Joined: 18-March 07
From: Kent



Thanks bobosola, I must admit that's slightly worrying though.

I'm not going to repair this tyre now as I've bought a couple from Tony F which I'll hopefully fit during the week so these'll go in the shed as spares.

Is it the case then that Stans is the way to go, and if the hole is too big for the sealant to automatically plug it, the tyre is pretty much a write-off anyway?

Pinprick holes in the sidewall will, I think, be pretty unavoidable for me, just because of the number of bramble/gulley combinations I end up in let alone all the flints!

Cheers

Chris smile.gif


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Jarl
post Oct 17 2009, 08:47 AM
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Joined: 12-November 06
From: Bath/Hampshire (uni/home)



QUOTE(bobosola @ Oct 17 2009, 12:38 AM) *
I tried patching from the inside but in both cases the patch forced its way through the wall under pressure to form a risky-looking bulge.


bigger patch?


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Gareth
post Oct 17 2009, 09:36 AM
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Joined: 28-July 04



Thicker patches don't bulge much through small sidewall holes. The kind of sidewall holes which can't be dealt with in this way are not suitable for use with a tube either which is inflated (therefore stretched thinner) and will also bulge alarmingly. If you are getting too many of these larger sidewall holes then you need tougher tyres with more sidewall protection Ghetto or whatever!


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